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How to Avoid the Sneezes on Your Family Holiday

“If you or your child suffers with hay fever and you are planning to travel abroad, there are things you can do to help minimise the impact of pollen,” says airborne allergens expert, Max Wiseberg (www.haymax.biz). “And there may be different tree, grass and weed pollens or mould to the UK, which you may be allergic to even if you don’t suffer at home.”

“Check the pollen calendar (try Accuweather) for your destination beforehand, so you can plan ahead. Usually coastal areas have lower pollen counts.”

“Use an organic, drug-free allergen barrier balm such as HayMax Kids, applied around your child’s nostrils and bones of the eyes in the morning, throughout the day and at night to trap more than a third of pollen before it enters the body [1]. Less allergen, less reaction.”

“Keep allergens off your child’s clothes and body. Wearing wraparound sunglasses when outdoors helps prevent pollen particles coming in contact with their eyes, and tying up long hair and wearing a hat or cap helps prevent pollen particles being caught in their hair. Washing their face as soon as they get indoors will wash away allergens so that they can’t cause a reaction.”

“Once you’ve arrived at your hotel or apartment, use the air conditioning. With the air conditioning on and the windows closed, you can considerably reduce indoor pollen exposure.”

“Time outings when pollen counts are lower, avoiding peak morning and evening periods, when symptoms are usually worst.”

“Taking a shower and changing your child’s clothes after returning from outdoor activities helps remove pollen from the hair, body and clothes, and reduces the amount they breathe in.”

“There may be different tree, grass and weed pollens or mould to the UK, which your child may be allergic to, so pack a pot of HayMax or HayMax Kids just in case!”

 

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Reference

[1] Chief Investigator: Professor Roy Kennedy, Principal Investigator: Louise Robertson, Researcher: Dr Mary Lewis, National Pollen & Aerobiology Research Unit, 1st February 2012.

Main image credit: Lawrence Crayton Unsplash